Huawei Technologies has rolled out a conservation plan in Africa that seeks to protect endangered animal species using 5G technologies.

The initiative will see the firm deploy hi-tech cameras and a 5G network to capture and transmit quality, real-time images of animals in their natural habitat.

The project is expected to not only open up conservation programmes to newer ways of preserving endangered animal species but also provide tourists with alternative modes of experiencing new destinations.

Huawei is using its 5G technology platform for live stream broadcasting for service providers to illustrate its capability for monitoring animal movements to enable conservationists to initiate reactive measures in cases where they face any dangers.

“We have shown the technological capability by successfully live streaming the endangered African penguin in its natural habitat at the Boulders Beach in Cape Town,” said conservationist and wildlife TV presenter Lauren Arthur.

“The live stream not only gave watchers the chance to experience the unique penguin colony, it also illustrated 5G’s potential as an enabler of environmental conservation.”

Kenya will benefit from the programme since its wild animals such as rhinos and elephants, face extinction threats from poachers seeking valuable ivories.

5G technology, Ms Arthur noted, is proving pivotal in allowing conservationists to monitor animal colonies across the African continent.

“Using a 5G camera, conservation experts may watch animals at every movement and help prevent negative incidents like bee attacks.”

“In the future, 5G won’t only enrich people’s digital lives, but will also bring real benefits and change to humans, companies, society, and the natural world,”

she added. 5G can be especially beneficial in Africa’s goal of achieving a digital economy.

She pointed out that sectors, where 5G was starting to play a role, included, health, education, mining and the consumer market.

So far, the firm has invested more than Sh100 million in animal conservation programs in Kenya over the last decade and a half.

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